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Accessible NEAs

Data Table

Observers, mission planners, and other interested users are invited to use the following tool to identify future observing opportunities for those near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) that may be well-suited to future human space flight round trip rendezvous missions. Please consider the assumptions and caveats related to these data to assist in their proper interpretation. (read more)

This list of potential mission targets, provided by NHATS, should not be interpreted as a complete list of viable NEAs for an actual human exploration mission. As the NEA orbits are updated, the viable mission targets and their mission parameters will change. To select an actual target and mission scenario, additional constraints must be applied including astronaut health and safety considerations, human space flight architecture elements, their performances and readiness, the physical nature of the target NEA and mission schedule constraints.

Constraints:   [[cHelpText]]

Optionally limit accessible NEAs to those matching the constraints below.

total dV
The total mission delta-V in km/s. This total delta-V includes the maneuver required to depart a notional 400 km altitude circular Earth parking orbit, the delta-V required to match the NEA's velocity at arrival, the delta-V required to depart the NEA, and the delta-V (if any) required to control atmospheric entry speed at Earth return.
total dur.
Total mission duration in days. The total mission duration includes the outbound flight time from Earth to the NEA, the stay time at the NEA, and the inbound flight time from the NEA back to Earth.
stay
The number of days spent at the NEA.
launch
Launch window constraint defined as starting year to ending year, where the ending year includes the last day of that year (e.g., 2015-2020 is from 2015-01-01 to 2020-12-31).
H
Absolute visual (V-band) magnitude in magnitude units.
OCC
Orbit Condition Code of the NEA's orbit when NHATS-analysis was performed, where 0 implies a well-determined orbit and 9 implies a very poorly-determined (highly uncertain) orbit.
Select 'Object' from table below to show trajectory details.
Object Orbit
ID
H
(mag)
Estimated
Diameter
(m)
OCC Min. delta-V
[delta-V, dur.]
(km/s), (d)
Min. Duration
[delta-V, dur.]
(km/s), (d)
Viable
Trajectories
Next Optical
Opportunity
(yyyy-mm [Vp])
Next Arecibo
Radar Opportunity
(yyyy-mm [SNR])
Next Goldstone
Radar Opportunity
(yyyy-mm [SNR])

Use the "Print" button above to print data contained in this table. Use the "CSV" or "Excel" buttons to download the data for use in your spreadsheet program. Allow a few seconds for downloads of large datasets.

Machine-readable data are available. See the API document for details.
Table Column Descriptions  |  [[legendButtonText]]
Object
Full designation of the target NEA (near-Earth asteroid).
Orbit ID
ID of the JPL NEA orbit used in this analysis
H (mag)
Absolute visual (V-band) magnitude in magnitude units.
Estimated Diameter (m)
Estimated diameter in meters showing the minimum and maximum likely size based on assumed maximum and minimum albedos of 0.60 and 0.03, respectively. If the size is "known", a single value is shown instead. If a single value is shown, it should still be considered an estimate.
OCC
Orbit Condition Code of the NEA's orbit when NHATS-analysis was performed, where 0 implies a well-determined orbit and 9 implies a very poorly-determined (highly uncertain) orbit.
Min. delta-V [delta-V, dur.] (km/s), (d)
The total delta-V in km/s and corresponding duration in days for the trajectory solution with the minimum total delta-V.
Min. Duration [delta-V, dur.] (km/s), (d)
The total delta-V in km/s and corresponding duration in days for the trajectory solution with the minimum possible total duration.
Viable Trajectories
The total number of NHATS-compliant trajectory solutions. This value serves as a proxy for accessibility of the NEA.
Next Optical Opportunity (yyyy-mm [Vp])
The year and month (yyyy-mm) during which the asteroid will next be observable optically from the Earth at a magnitude of 24.0 or brighter, solar elongation > 60 deg and plane-of-sky (POS) uncertainty < 1.5 deg. When the latter limit is exceeded the object is considered lost, in which case it can only be observed via a serendipitous re-discovery by an asteroid survey program. Leading and trailing '?' indicate when such a survey re-discovery may be possible. [Vp] is the predicted peak magnitude during the opportunity. Follow this link for more details.
Next Arecibo Radar Opportunity (yyyy-mm [SNR])
The year and month (yyyy-mm) of the next optimal Arecibo radar observing opportunity. To be considered observable, the asteroid must be at an accessible declination, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) must be at least 10, and the plane-of-sky uncertainty must be less than 0.75 arc-min. [SNR] indicates the peak SNR value during the opportunity. Follow this link for more details.
Next Goldstone Radar Opportunity (yyyy-mm [SNR])
The year and month (yyyy-mm) of the next optimal Goldstone radar observing opportunity. To be considered observable, the asteroid must be at an accessible declination, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) must be at least 10, and the plane-of-sky uncertainty must be less than 0.75 arc-min. [SNR] indicates the peak SNR value during the opportunity. Follow this link for more details.